PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF DEPRESSION IN ADULTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

CM MCKERCHER1, KA SANDERSON1,2, AJ VENN1, AL NEIL1, MD JOSE1,3,4

1Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania; 2School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; 3School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania; 3Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Tasmania

Aim: To examine the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms in adults with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Background: Depression is independently associated with increased risk of mortality and poor health-related quality of life in dialysis patients, yet few studies have examined depression in adults with CKD prior to the initiation of renal replacement therapy.

Methods: 94 adults (29 women, 31%), aged ≥18 years (71.3±11.8 years) with CKD (eGFR <30 mls/min/1.73m2) and not receiving dialysis were recruited via treating physicians. Prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms was assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Cross-sectional associations between depressive symptoms and demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors were examined using multivariable linear regression.

Results: Mean PHQ-9 score was 4.1±5.1, range 0-27. Prevalence of mild depression was 23% (PHQ-9 ≥5 & <10) and major depression was 12% (PHQ-9 ≥10). In partially adjusted models, lower age, increasing BMI, increasing number of symptoms of anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory, p<0.001), lower perceived social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, p<0.05) and lower perceived physical health (SF-36 Physical Component Summary, p<0.05) were associated with increased severity of depressive symptoms. Anxiety, social support, and physical health remained significant in fully adjusted multivariable models. There was no association between kidney function (eGFR; mean 21.8±6.4 mls/min/1.73m2) and depressive symptoms.

Conclusions: Consistent with other chronic disease populations, the prevalence of major depression in this cohort was higher than the age-matched general population. Similarly, anxiety, social support and physical health appear to be important correlates of depressive symptoms in adults with pre-dialysis CKD. Prospective assessment of this cohort will allow us to examine the trajectory of depressive symptoms and their influence on health-related outcomes.

About ANZSN

The ASM is hosted by Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

The aims of the Society are to promote and support the study of the kidney and urinary tract in health and disease, and to ensure the highest professional standards for the practice of nephrology in Australia and New Zealand.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the conference.
/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Conference-Design-400x400.png
© 2015 - 2016 Conference Design Pty Ltd