ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SURGICAL PATIENTS IN AN OUTER-METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL

B LOGAN1,2, S CHANDLER1,2, K-S TAN1, A FLEURY1,2, KW CHAN1, D VARDESH1,2
1Logan Hospital, Meadowbrook, Australia, 2Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia

Aim: To profile the characteristics of patients who have an acute kidney injury (AKI) while admitted to the surgical ward of a secondary level hospital, and to determine how severity of AKI influences patient outcomes.
Background: Past research demonstrates that patients with an AKI can be at increased risk of adverse outcomes. Better understanding of this cohort could enable early identification and prevention.
Methods: Surgical patients with an AKI were asked to consent for the prospective collection of data from their records. 74 patients over a 20-month period consented to inclusion. Analysis entailed statistical description.
Results: Our data showed that 22% of patients had CKD stage 3 or 4. The majority of patients (57%) had an AKI at the time of their presentation. Of those who had surgery, 60% had an AKI prior to surgery. Urine output was poorly documented in medical records. 89% of the AKI were from pre-renal causes. KDIGO stage 1 AKI was the most common at 68%. Average length of stay increased with the KDIGO severity (1: 18.9; 2: 21.4; 3: 37.8 days). 15% of patients required ICU, 5% needed dialysis, and 4% died during hospitalisation. At the time of discharge 57% had recovered their renal function.
Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that AKI in surgical patients occurred most often pre-operatively suggesting that their underlying acute surgical condition predisposed them to AKI. Urine output was poorly documented during clinical assessment suggesting that urine output criteria to diagnose AKI is difficult to employ routinely on wards not accustomed to measuring urine output. Patients with more severe AKI had a longer length of stay.


Biography:
Benignus is a Medical Registrar presently training for the physician’s exam. He has an interest in geriatrics.

About ANZSN

The ASM is hosted by Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

The aims of the Society are to promote and support the study of the kidney and urinary tract in health and disease, and to ensure the highest professional standards for the practice of nephrology in Australia and New Zealand.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the Annual Scientific Meeting

© 2015 - 2016 Conference Design Pty Ltd