SIGNIFICANT IMPROVEMENT IN RENAL FUNCTION IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED MULTIPLE MYELOMA

I ISMAIL1, A SAPONARA1, M MANTHA1,2,  K BAVISHI1,2, S DHEDA1,2
1Department of renal medicine, Cairns Hospital,, Australia, 2School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Cairns, , Australia

Aim: To analyse the epidemiology of Renal Impairment (RI) in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients in Far North Queensland (FNQ).
Background:Cairns hospital is a major referral centre in FNQ for haematological disease. Renal impairment (RI) is one of the most common complications in myeloma.
Methods: A single centre retrospective analysis of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Baseline investigations, treatment and mortality, were collected on newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients over the last decade.
Results: There was a total of 93 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients over a 10-year. The mean age was 68 ±11 years, males 56%. The majority (82%) were Caucasians.  The incidence of RI, defined as eGFR < 60 μmol/L/1.73m², was 48% at the time of diagnosis of myeloma.RI was strongly associated with a higher mean calcium (2.70 vs 2.37 mmols/L, 95% CI; 0.15 to 0.52 mmol/L, t₉₀ = 3.65, p <0.001), higher mean β-2-microglobulin levels (11.82 vs 3.03 mg/L, 95% CI; 3.49 to 14.08 mg/L, t₆₅=3.32, p =0.001) and higher mean free light chain levels (1535 vs 727 mg/L, 95% CI; -16 to 1633 mg/L, t₈₂=1.95, p=0.05). Patients who had RI were more likely to be readmitted (mean hospital admissions 30 vs 14, 95%CI -3 to 35, t₉₁=1.67, p = 0.09).There were 7 renal biopsies with cast nephropathy the commonest presentation. The mean eGFR improved by 7 mls/min/1.73m² (95%CI; -2.21 to -12.58) at six months (t₇₂=-2.84, p = 0.006).
Conclusions: Nearly half of newly diagnosed myeloma patients have renal impairment. Treatment for myeloma resulted in a nett improvement in eGFR after 6 months. However, they are more likely to be readmitted. Myeloma is uncommon in the indigenous population.


Biography:
Dr A Saponara is a medical registrar at the Cairns Hospital.

About ANZSN

The ASM is hosted by Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

The aims of the Society are to promote and support the study of the kidney and urinary tract in health and disease, and to ensure the highest professional standards for the practice of nephrology in Australia and New Zealand.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the Annual Scientific Meeting

© 2015 - 2016 Conference Design Pty Ltd