OUTCOMES OF INTENSIVE CARE PATIENTS WITH ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY REQUIRING RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY

K KARPE1,2, S RAI, V DAMODARAN2
1Renal Services, Canberra Hospital, Garran, Australia, 2Australian National University Medical School, Acton, Australia, 3Intensive Care Unit, Canberra Hospital, Garran, Australia

Background: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) requiring Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy (CRRT) in the Intensive care unit (ICU)  is known to be associated with high short-term mortality. Long-term outcomes of such patients is not well studied.
Aims: To determine risk factors for mortality of ICU patients with AKI requiring CRRT and  long-term outcomes
Methods: Adult patients admitted to the ICU with AKI requiring CRRT were included. ICU, hospital electronic records and renal database were interrogated for outcome measures.
Outcomes: Mortality and dialysis dependence. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to identify predictors of dialysis and mortality at one-year.
Results: A total 190 patients were analysed in the 2 year study period after excluding patients with pre-existing ESRD and readmissions.
The median length of hospital and ICU stay for these patients were 16 days and 3 days  respectively. Hospital mortality was 37.4% which increased to 55.6% at one-year. At one-year 6.3% patients were still dependent on dialysis. On univariate analysis, heparin circuit anticoagulation(OR 0.52, CI 0.35 – 0.77) and creatinine level on ICU admission ( p=0.02) were associated with reduced mortality. Creatinine level on ICU admission (OR 1.65 p=0.04), was associated with dialysis dependence at one year. On multivariate analysis only APACHE II score was a significant predictor of mortality at one year with an OR 1.06, per one unit increase in score (p=0.02). High proportion of survivors (40.3%) had increased healthcare utilization with ≥ 2 hospital readmissions at one-year.
Conclusions: Although critically ill patients with AKI treated with CRRT have high one- year mortality at 55.6%, only a small proportion of survivors (6.3%) are still dependent on dialysis.


Biography:
Dr Krishna Karpe is a Nephrologist at the Canberra Hospital Renal Services and lecturer at the Australian National University Medical school

About ANZSN

The ASM is hosted by Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

The aims of the Society are to promote and support the study of the kidney and urinary tract in health and disease, and to ensure the highest professional standards for the practice of nephrology in Australia and New Zealand.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the Annual Scientific Meeting

© 2015 - 2016 Conference Design Pty Ltd