CKD PREVALENCE AMONG AUSTRALIAN ADULTS OVER TIME 1999–2000 AND 2011–12

L TRINH1,  R JUCKES1,  S CHADBAN2,3, K POLKINGHORNE4,5, K BREWER1
1Australian Institute Of Health And Welfare, Canberra, Australia, 2Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia, 3The University Of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 4Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia, 5Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate if there has been a change in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) prevalence over time.
Background:  CKD affects over a million Australians but remains a highly under-diagnosed condition. CKD is often detected too late to be reversible and is a large burden on health systems.
Methods: CKD prevalence was estimated from comparable biomarker results collected in the 1999–2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) and the 2011–2012 National Health Measures Survey (NHMS): estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR). The comparison was made possible after recalculating the variances of the prevalence estimates for the AusDiab study and using the same eGFR formula and ACR measure in both surveys.
Results: The age-and-sex adjusted CKD prevalence rate has remained stable affecting 1 in 10 adults in both 1999–2000 and 2011–12. In both surveys, there was no difference in prevalence rate between males and females and the rate increased with age. The estimated number of adults with CKD has increased by almost 50% between 1999–2000 and 2011–12. There was a large increase in the number of adults with moderate to severe CKD (stages 3–5), mostly driven by an increase in cases with moderate CKD (stage 3) and the population growth among the 65+.
Conclusion: There has been no change in the overall CKD prevalence rate although the number of Australians with CKD has increased significantly, particularly for those with stage 3–5 CKD.


Biography:
Kate Brewer is currently a project officer in the Cardiovascular, Diabetes and Kidney Unit at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in Canberra.

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