DIETARY INFLAMMATORY INDEX AND THE AGEING KIDNEY IN OLDER WOMEN: A 10-YEAR PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

N BONDONNO1, A BIRD3,  J LEWIS2, J HODGSON4,  N SHIVAPPA6, J HÉBERT6, R WOODMAN, G WONG2,  D KERR3,  R PRINCE5, W LIM5
1University Of Western Australia, Currambine, Australia, 2Centre for Kidney Research, Children’s Hospital at Westmead. School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 3Curtin University, School of Public Health, Bentley , Perth, Australia, 4School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia, 5Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, 6Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, United States of America, 7Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

Aim: To examine the associations of dietary inflammatory index (DIITM), trajectory of kidney function decline and 10-year risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related events (hospitalisations and/or mortality) in older Caucasian women.
Background: Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of age-related kidney disease and diet is a key moderator of systemic inflammation. Recently, the DII was devised to estimate the overall inflammatory potential of an individual’s diet, but the association between DII and kidney function decline and renal events in the general population remains unknown.
Methods: We followed up 1443 women, aged ≥70 years, from the Calcium Intake Fracture Outcome Study. The associations between DII in quintiles (an inflammatory score derived from linking 32 individual food components to inflammatory markers) and 10-year change in eGFR (at baseline, 5 and 10 years) and CKD-related events (n=123) were assessed using linear mixed modelling and Cox regression, respectively.
Results: The mean (SD) age and eGFR of the study cohort were 75.2(2.7) years and 65.9(12.9)ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. The mean(SD) annual percentage change in eGFR of women in the lowest and highest DII quintiles were -0.98(1.91) and -1.42(2.03)ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. Compared to the lowest DII quintile, the differences of least square means of the highest DII quintile was -4.97 ml/min/1.73m2  (p<0.01). Compared to the lowest DII quintile, the adjusted hazard ratio for CKD-related events for women in the highest DII quintile was 2.08(95%CI0.99,4.37, p=0.05).
Conclusion: These findings suggest that a highly pro-inflammatory diet may be associated with a more rapid kidney function decline and possibly greater risk of CKD events in older women, suggesting the consideration of integrating dietary measurements when predicting the risk of kidney function decline.


Biography:
Nicky is a Research Associate working for the University of Western Australia at Royal Perth Hospital. The primary focus of her research is looking at how polyphenols (compounds found naturally in plants, fruits and vegetables) can reduce the risk of heart disease, in particular, in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease. She hopes to show that the incidence of heart disease in Australia can be greatly reduced if we increase the intake of specific polyphenols in our diet.

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