FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH LOSS TO FOLLOW-UP OF LIVING KIDNEY DONORS (LKD) AND EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN BODY WEIGHT AFTER DONATION

A KRISHNAN1, A CHAKERA1, N BOUDVILLE1, D CHAN1, S DOGRA1, B HE1, B JACQUES1, L DELRIVERE1, C TING1, W LIM1
1Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Australia

Aim: To determine the factors associated with loss to follow-up of LKD and to evaluate changes in body weight post-donation.
Background: There is a small but significant risk of developing end-stage kidney and cardiovascular disease after donation, with relative risks up to 11-times compared to age-matched healthy population. Increased body weight is associated with kidney disease. Hence, donor follow-up is an important responsibility of the transplant community. Even though multiple donor and centre-specific factors have been identified to influence long-term outcome, there are no published data on factors relating to loss to follow-up of LKDs in Australia and New Zealand.
Methods: This was a single-centre retrospective study of 62 LKDs between 2013 and 2016. Factors associated with loss to follow-up and weight gain (defined as ≥10% increase in weight ≥12 months post-donation) were examined in adjusted logistic regression analyses.
Results: Eight of 62 (15%) were excluded (reallocated interstate/overseas) leaving a study cohort of 54 LKD, of which 43% were lost to follow-up within 12-months post-donation. In the adjusted model, younger donors (age >55 years: referent; age <40 years: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 7.29, [95%CI 1.03-3.25], p=0.05) and donors who experienced longer length of stay (LOS; adjusted OR 1.82, [95%CI 1.03-3.25], p=0.04) were more likely to not attend follow-up. Of the 28 (52%) donors who had follow-up weights ≥12 months post-donation, only 4 (14%) had gained over 10% in body weight at follow-up with no predictors of weight gain post-transplant.
Conclusions: Younger age and longer LOS were factors associated with loss to follow-up. Further detailed analysis evaluating the barriers to identify potentially modifiable risk factors in these donors will be critical to improve rates of follow-up.


Biography:
Anoushka completed her advanced training in February this year, having trained in Perth for two years, followed by a year of training in Vancouver, Canada. She has a keen interest in renal transplantation, particularly cancer associated outcomes and donor outcomes.

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The ASM is hosted by Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology.

The aims of the Society are to promote and support the study of the kidney and urinary tract in health and disease, and to ensure the highest professional standards for the practice of nephrology in Australia and New Zealand.

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