CONTENT ANALYSIS OF THE ACCURACY AND HEALTH LITERACY DEMAND OF YOUTUBE VIDEOS FOR PEOPLE WITH POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

K LAMBERT1, T MA1, A JAVADPOUR1, C MIGLIORETTO1

1University Of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia

Aim: Determine the accuracy, understandability and actionability of YouTube videos for people with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)
Background: PKD is a frequent cause of kidney failure in Australia. People with PKD frequently access the internet for dietary information. However previous research has found that online dietary information for people with kidney disease is frequently produced at a level not easily understood. No recent studies have evaluated the health literacy demand of information found on YouTube.
Methods: Using a systematic search strategy 17 eligible videos were reviewed. The accuracy of information was evaluated by comparing the key messages with relevant evidence-based guidelines. The Patient Education Material Assessment Tool (PEMAT) was used to assess understandability and actionability, referred to as ‘health literacy demand’.
Results: The proportion of videos considered accurate was accurate was 94%. Five of seventeen videos exceeded the PEMAT threshold score of >70% to be considered ‘understandable’ (overall mean score 63.2%, range: 33-90%). Only three of seventeen videos exceeded the PEMAT threshold score of >70% and were therefore considered ‘actionable’ (overall mean score 56.1%, range 0-100%). There was no relationship between video duration and health literacy demand (Spearman’s rho for understandability -0.29, p=0.27; actionability: Spearman’s rho -0.46, p=0.06).The majority of videos were produced by reputable organisations (15/17, 88%). Explaining medical terms, using active voice, providing a summary, and explaining to users how to apply the information are areas for improvement.
Conclusions: Compared to previous work there has been improvement in the accuracy of dietary information on YouTube for people with PKD. However, further work is required to reduce the health literacy demand, specifically to improve the understandability and actionability of information.


Biography:
Kelly is an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and Renal Dietitian. Her research focuses on the impact of health literacy in people with CKD, health communication among vulnerable populations and behaviour change research. Kelly is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Program Director of Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Wollongong

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