GUT MICROBIOME COMPOSITION REMAINS STABLE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH DIABETES-RELATED EARLY TO LATE STAGE CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

A LECAMWASAM1,2,3, T M NELSON6, L RIVERA3, E I EKINCI2,4, R SAFFERY1,5, K M DWYER3

1Murdoch Children’s Research Institute- Epigenetics Research, Melbourne, Australia, 2Austin Health- Department of Endocrinology, Heidelberg, Australia, 3Deakin University- Department of Medicine, Waurn Ponds, Australia, 4University of Melbourne- Department of Medicine, Melbourne, Australia, 5University of Melbourne- Department of Paediatrics, Melbourne, Australia, 6Griffith University- Menzies Health Institute, Southport, Australia

Aim: We investigated a cross-sectional study of patients with early and late diabetes associated chronic kidney disease, to identify possible microbial differences between these two groups and across each of the stages of diabetic chronic kidney disease.

Background: Individuals with diabetes and chronic kidney disease display gut dysbiosis when compared to healthy controls. However, it is unknown whether there is a change in dysbiosis across the stages of diabetic chronic kidney disease.

Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited 95 adults. DNA extracted from collected stool samples were used for 16S rRNA sequencing to identify the bacterial community in the gut.

Results: The phylum Firmicutes was the most abundant and its mean relative abundance was similar in the early and late chronic kidney disease group, 45.99 +/- 0.58% and 49.39 +/- 0.55% respectively. The mean relative abundance for family Bacteroidaceae, was also similar in the early and late group, 29.15 +/- 2.02% and 29.16 +/- 1.70% respectively. The lower abundance of Prevotellaceae remained similar across both the early 3.87 +/- 1.66% and late 3.36 +/- 0.98% diabetic chronic kidney disease groups.

Conclusions: The most interesting observation is that the relative abundance of these gut microbes do not change across the early and late stages of diabetic chronic kidney disease. We hypothesise that the dysbiotic microbiome acquired during the early stages of diabetic chronic kidney disease remains relatively stable and is only one of many risk factors that influence progressive kidney dysfunction.


Biography:

Ashani Lecamwasam is a specialist physician in Nephrology. She undertook her undergraduate medical degree at the University of Adelaide and did her internship at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. She moved to Melbourne for her basic and advanced physician training. Ashani was awarded her fellowship in 2015 and currently does public work at Northern Health and some private practice. She has an interest in research, specifically in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease and is undertaking her PhD, through Deakin University in collaboration with the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and Austin Health. She has multiple international and national publications.

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