COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF A MOBILE PHONE TEXT MESSAGING INTERVENTION (KIDNEYTEXT) TO IMPROVE DIETARY BEHAVIOURS IN PEOPLE RECEIVING HAEMODIALYSIS

J DAWSON1, M HOWELL1,4, K HOWARD4, K L. CAMPBELL1,5, J C. CRAIG6, A TONG1,4, V LEE1,2,7

1Centre For Kidney Research, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, 2Westmead Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, St George Hospital, Sydney, Australia, 4Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 5Healthcare Excellence and Innovation, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Australia, 6College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia, 7Department of Renal Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia

Aim: To determine the cost-effectiveness of a mobile phone text messaging intervention (KIDNEYTEXT) targeting dietary behaviours in people receiving haemodialysis.
Background: A key component of determining feasibility is to determine whether an intervention is cost-effective. There is a paucity of data available to inform the cost-effectiveness of eHealth interventions in improving patient health outcomes.
Methods: A trial-based economic evaluation from a health system perspective of a 6-month pilot randomized controlled trial (KIDNEYTEXT) was undertaken. Outcomes included the cost of the KIDNEYTEXT intervention, cost-effectiveness and marginal effects on total costs. KIDNEYTEXT trial registration – ACTRN12617001084370.
Results: The cost of developing and maintaining the KIDNEYTEXT intervention was AU$160 per participant. At 6 months the total costs were AU$2058 higher in the usual care arm compared to the intervention arm. The incremental benefits were greater than 0 for both QALYs and dietary adherence. The largest component of total costs was related to admission to hospital.
Conclusion: Mobile phone text messages targeting dietary behaviours may be cost saving, while maintaining similar or improved dietary behaviours. A larger trial with longer follow-up time is warranted.


Biography:
Jess is a PhD candidate and renal dietitian with over 10 years clinical experience. Jess’s goal is to combine her clinical practice with innovative research in nutritional management to improve care and outcomes in people with chronic kidney disease. Jess’ PhD is evaluating the impact of eHealth interventions to improve dietary care in people with chronic kidney disease.

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