AN OVERVIEW OF PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOMES IN THE CKD.QLD REGISTRY, AUSTRALIA, 2011 to 2018

Z WANG1,2, V DIWAN1,2, S VENUTHURUPALLI1,3, H HEALY1,2,4, THE CKD.QLD CONSORTIUM THE CKD.QLD CONSORTIUM5

1NHMRC CKD.CRE and CKD.QLD, Brisbane, Australia, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 3Kidney Health Service, Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, Australia , 4Kidney Health Service, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, 5the CKD.QLD consortium, , Australia

Aim: To profile patients in CKD.QLD
Background: CKD.QLD is a research platform for chronic kidney disease (CKD) which embraces nine of the ten public renal speciality hubs in Queensland.
Methods: Patients were recruited from mid-2011 onwards and followed until endpoints (death or RRT) or censor date in June 2018.   Demographic and clinical data were compiled from medical records, while Queensland Health provided data on hospital admissions and endpoints.
Results: 7,025 patients were followed for 24,824 person years (py).  Males comprised 54%. Age at consent was 17-100 yr, median 68 yr. 63.6% were CKD stages 3b,4&5, leading renal diagnoses were diabetic nephropathy (24.5%) and renovascular disease (21.1%) and 31% and 41.4% had  micro- and macro-albuminuria/proteinuria. 725 (11%) started RRT and 1,358 (20%) died without RRT, while 1,380 developed endstage kidney failure (ESKF, renal deaths or started RRT). Incidences (events per 100 py) of starting RRT, death without RRT, and ESKF were 2.92, 5.47, and 5.56, respectively. All increased dramatically with CKD stage at consent.  Median age at starting RRT was 60.1 years, and of death without RRT was 78 years.  Annual eGFR loss was about 20% higher in males than females, with higher incidences of ESKF and RRT (6.2 vs 4.9 and 3.4 vs 2.4 respectively).  Aboriginal/TSI people (10.9%) were about 15yr younger, usually diabetic (41%), more often female (51%), and had higher incidences of ESKF (9.0 vs 5.5) and of RRT ( 6.0 vs 2.7) than nonIndigenous people.
Conclusions: There are differences by gender, Indigenous status and in outcomes among CKD patients.  Those dying without RRT greatly outnumber those who start RRT, and survive much longer before their endpoint.   Management challenges are many and diverse.


Biography:
Dr Zaimin Wang is a senior research fellow at center for chronic disease, Brisbane Royal Clinical Unit, Faculty of Medicine of UQ. His research involves epidemiology of chronic diseases including kidney disease, CVD and Diabetes. He is also working as data manager and biostatician.

Recent Comments
    Categories