CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AND COMORBIDITY IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES OF AUSTRALIA

CHILUMKURTI V1, ZHANG J2,3, WANG Z2,3, DIWAN V2,3, HOY W2,3

1University Of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 3NHMRC CKD CRE, Brisbane, Australia

Aim: To explore the association of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) with comorbid conditions in the Indigenous communities of Australia.

Background: Based on Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry data, in 2017, approximately 8.8% of people receiving treatment for End Stage Kidney Disease in Australia were identified as Indigenous. In the decade leading to this finding, the prevalence of CKD among Indigenous adults had shown a rising pattern with age. In 2012-13, among those aged 18-34 years, 9% had CKD increasing to 49% in those aged 65 and over.

Methods: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Measures Survey (NATSIHMS 2012-13) collected data on CKD and risk factors in a cohort of 3,300 Indigenous people Australia wide. The survey used results of blood and urine samples to measure two aspects of kidney function: estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria. Kidney disease was confirmed only if albuminuria or eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73m2 had persisted for at least 3 months. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2020) conducted a regression analysis to explore the statistical associations of CKD with comorbid conditions and reported them as odds ratios.

Results: Among various risk factors, hypertension and diabetes were significantly associated with CKD. People with hypertension were estimated to be twice as likely to have CKD as normotensive people. Those with diabetes were estimated to be 2.9 times as likely to have CKD as nondiabetics at 95% confidence intervals.

Conclusion: These findings are consistent with the comorbidity relationships reported in the wider literature and indicate that diagnosis of diabetes and hypertension in Indigenous communities is a screening opportunity for CKD at the primary health services level.


Biography:

Vishweswar CHILUMKURTI is a PhD student at the University of Queensland. He has studied Medicine at the Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India. He works in the community services setting with socially disadvantaged people. He has Masters degrees in Health Services Management and Public Health. Currently, he is trying hard to improve his tennis serve and striving to get fit enough to run 5 km in under 30 minutes.

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