MUTATION OF REGULATORY PHOSPHORYLATION SITES IN PFKFB2 DOES NOT AFFECT METFORMIN’S PROTECTIVE EFFECTS AGAINST RENAL FIBROSIS

HARLEY G1, KATERELOS M1, GLEICH K1, MOUNT P1,2, POWER D1,2

1Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia, 2University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

Aim: To determine if modification of glycolysis has a critical role in metformin’s protective effects against renal fibrosis.

Background: Metformin has been shown to have protective effects in mouse models of renal fibrosis via its effects on fatty acid oxidation but the contribution of glycolysis to this effect is unclear. 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB) is a key regulator of glycolysis in the kidney and is not believed to have an effect on fatty acid oxidation.

Methods: Mice with inactivating mutations of the phosphorylation sites in PFKFB2 (PFKFB2 KI mice) were generated, which is predicted to reduce the ability to increase the rate of glycolysis following stimulation. These were compared with wild-type controls. Mice were administered metformin via drinking water and a unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) model was used. The degree of fibrosis was assessed by Western blot and RT-PCR.

Results: In the PFKFB2 KI mice treated with metformin, there was decreased fibrosis following UUO as assessed by Western blot for fibronectin (p<0.05) and RT-PCR for alpha-SMA, collagen-3 and F4.80. There was no significant difference between WT and PFKFB2 KI mice treated with metformin in regards to the degree of fibrosis following UUO in any of the Western blot or RT-PCR parameters that were measured.

Conclusions: These data show that inhibition of the regulation of glycolysis by PFKFB2 does not prevent metformin from having protective effects against renal fibrosis in a UUO model.


Biography:

Dr Geoffrey Harley received his MBBS at Monash University and Masters of Medicine through the University of Sydney. He is an Honorary Consultant Nephrologist through the Austin Hospital, Melbourne, whilst undertaking dual training with Intensive Care Medicine. He is currently completing a PhD through the University of Melbourne with a basic science focus on the role of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis in acute kidney injury.

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