ANTHROPOMETRIC PROFILE IN INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS IN THE EGFR STUDY

C FEENEY1, J HUGHES2,3, K O’DEA4, A CASS5, W. HOY6, R. MACISAAC7, L MAPLE-BROWN2,3

1Charles Darwin University; 2Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin; 3Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin; 4University of South Australia, Adelaide; 5The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney University of Sydney, Sydney; 6School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane; 7University of Melbourne, Melbourne St Vincents Hospital, Melbourne.

Background: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (TSI) peoples have a higher burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes than non-Indigenous Australians.  Anthropometric profile is one factor that may contribute to this difference.

Aim: To describe and compare the anthropometric profiles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants in the eGFR Study.

Methods: 467 Aboriginal participants and 186 Torres Strait Islander of the eGFR Study were assessed.  Participants included adults with good health, diabetes and chronic kidney disease, and excluded people dependent on renal replacement therapy.  Nutritional status measures included weight, body circumferences and skin-fold thickness. Group mean values and p value for t-test are reported.

Results: Aboriginal participants were lighter than Torres Strait Islander participants [males: (, 84.3kg, 95.3kg p <0.001), females (78.4kg, 86.6kg p <0.001)], had a lower body mass index [(male 27.8kg/m, 31.5kg/m2 , p = 0.002, female 29.6 kg/m2 , 33.0 kg/m2  p <0.001)], as well as a higher skin fold thicknesses at most sites. However, Aboriginal participants had a higher waist to hip ratio (WHR) than Torres Strait Islander participants [males: (0.98, 0.95 p = 0.05), females (0.93, 0.89 p <0.001)].

Conclusions: WHR revealed that Aboriginal participants had a higher risk anthropometric profile compared to Torres Strait Islander participants despite lower weight and BMI. Therefore this supports the view that WHR should be included in routine clinical, nutritional and metabolic assessment in both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

Recent Comments
    Categories